This Day In History: 1915-11-04

After a brief two day deployment to the front trenches the 2nd Battalion was ordered to withdrew  to billets to the rear. This marked the end of the Battalion’s activities on the Western Front. In just over 12 months of operations the Battalion’s total casualties were: British officers: 13 killed, three wounded, 1 missing, 9 sick, three died of wounds; Gurkha officers: nine killed, seven wounded, two missing, 21 sick, one died of wounds; Other ranks: 135 killed, 303 wounded, 166 missing, 380 sick, 16 died of wounds, 10 died in hospital.

Link to HM the King’s Farewell Message dated October 25th 1915.?

“Officers, NCOs and men of the Indian Corps, more than a year ago I summoned you from India to fight for the safety of my empire and the honour of my pledged word on the battlefields of Belgium and France. The confidence which I then expressed in your sense of duty, your courage, and chivalry, you have since then nobly justified.

I now require your presence in another field of action, ,but before you leave France I send you my dear and gallant son the Prince of Wales, who has shared with my armnies the dangers and hardships of the campaign, to thank you in my name for your services and to express my satisfaction.

British and Indian comrades-in-arms, yours has been a fellowship in toils and hardships, in courage and endurance often against great odds, in deeds nobly done in days of ever memorable conflict. In a warfare waged under new conditions and in peculiarly trying circumstances you have worthily upheld the honour of the Empire, and the great traditions of my army in India.

I have followed your fortunes with the deepest interest and watched your gallant actions with pride and satisfaction. I mourn with you the loss of many brave officers and men. Let it be your consolation, as it was their pride, that they freely gave their lives in a just cause for the honour of their Sovereign and the safety of my empire. They died as gallant soldiers, and I shall ever hold their sacrifice in grateful remembrance.

You leave France with a just pride in honourable deeds already achieved, and with my assured confidence that your proved valour and experience will contribute to further victories in the new fields to which you go.

I pray God to bless and guard you and to bring you back safely when the final victory is won, each to his own home, there to be welcomed with honour among his own people”.

GEORGE R.I.

Link to Campaign Medals Sers 20/21?