This Day In History: 1915-02-19

Regimental history records that the 2nd Battalion: “ had become the recipients of a most kindly and generous token of the  friendship existing since 1857 between the 60th Rifles (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) and the 2nd Goorkhas, of the valued gift by the former Regiment of £100 towards ameliorating any distress which had fallen to our men and their families. This further proof of the strong bond of friendship between the two Regiments could not be but an extra incentive to our efforts in the cause for which the British Army was fighting”.

Link to Correspondence?:

From the. 60th Rifles Aid society, the Rifle Depot, Winchester, 19 February 1915

“Sir

The Vice Patrons and Executive. Committee of this society desire me to write – as it may be some gratification to your gallant Riflemen in the trenches, little though it be – to say that the sum of £100 has been granted by the King’s Royal Rifles Branch of this Society for use in any way you think best at the time as it is feared there must be some distress in the ranks of your Battalion. I am to assure you that all ranks of the King’s Royal Rifles follow with the greatest interest the doing s of their sister Regiment, whose Riflemen have proved themselves worthy successors of the heroes of the Mutiny.

We deeply regret the loss of so many valuable and gallant lives both in officers and. Riflemen.

Kindly accept this gift in the spirit in which it is tendered, and it is hoped the friendship of the two Regiments cemented at Delhi may continue for all time.

Messrs Cox & o have remitted the amount through their Indian branch to the Regimental HQ at Dehra Doon.

I have the honour to be

Sir

Your most obedient servant

J W Dane Major (Secretary)”

 

From the 2nd Battalion. In the Field. 3 March 1915.

 

Sir

I have to thank you for your letter of 19th February which has been read to all ranks of the Battalion.

The kind action of the Society in presenting the sum of £100 towards the provident expenses of the Regiment has been deeply appreciated. No better stimulant could have been received by any Regiment. Whatever losses we suffer the esprit de corps will always remain, and with it the honoured friendship of the King’s Royal Rifles.

Our one regret is that we are not brigaded with one of your battalions, so that we could be side by side throughout the war. The men are. Not fighting for their country, but as Riflemen of the British Army, and to feel that their old comrades of the Mutiny are watching them has given them something else to link to the cause for which they are fighting.

 

Please convey to the society the hearty thanks of every man in the Regiment for its kind gift. I am sending a copy of your letter to the Adjutant of our other Battalion , which unfortunately is not with us here, that they too, may appreciate it as much as we do.

I have the honour to be

Sir

Your most obedient servant

E Corse Scott Lieut. And Adjutant.